A short video by Thomas P. Sterry, MD, a plastic surgeon, describing scar revision of a facial scar followed by dermabrasion.

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Prescription placebos used in research and pra...

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Renovo, a UK company, announced on February 11 that Phase III trials of its lead scar reduction treatment, Juvista (human TGF-beta3) had failed on its primary endpoint (assessment of the scars by independent experts) and on its secondary endpoint (assessment by the patients themselves). The news was even worse as the company is now trying figure out why in some patients, the half of the scar treated with placebo seemed to heal better than the Juvista-treated half.

The REVISE Trial was a double blind, within patient, placebo controlled trial to assess the efficacy of two dose levels of Juvista (200ng and 500ng/100ul/linear cm of wound margin) given twice, following wound closure and 24 hours later, on the appearance of scars following scar revision surgery. Over 350 patients were recruited from 56 centres in UK France, Hungary, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Denmark, Latvia and USA. The EMA agreed primary endpoint for efficacy was a photographic based assessment at 12 months following surgery by an independent panel of experts using the Global Scar Comparison Scale. Secondary endpoints included an assessment of the scars using the Global Scar Comparison Scale by the patients themselves and by the clinical trial investigator. None of the primary or secondary endpoints were met for either dose.

For some additional analysis visit IN VIVO blog.

Surgeon doing a surgical breast biopsy.

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PharmEcosse, a Scottish company, is starting clinical trials to explore the use of insulin (PE001) for the reduction or prevention of surgical scars in patients undergoing non-cancer bilateral breast surgery. The trial will commence in January 2011 and is expected to report in the first quarter of 2013.

Insulin was found to control the activity of the key cells involved in wound closure and subsequent scar formation which apparently slows down or stops the build up of scar tissue.

For more information about taking part in clinical trials, please go to pharmecosse.com

We occasionally receive questions by email or in the comments section. Let us know if you have any questions related to scars, scar treatment or scar prevention and we will try to answer them. You can ask the questions anonymously via the comments section below. And remember, the only stupid question is the one you don’t ask.

Trained attack dog Samo leaps forward toward a...

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The number of Americans hospitalized for dog bites almost doubled over a 15-year-period, increasing to 9,500 in 2008 from 5,100 in 1993, a new government study reports (Emergency Department Visits and Inpatient Stays Involving Dog Bites, 2008). The increase vastly exceeded population growth, and pet ownership increased only slightly during the same period, said the report’s author, Anne Elixhauser, a senior research scientist with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Common principal diagnoses for dog bite-related hospitalizations included skin and subcutaneous tissue infections; open wounds of extremities; open wounds of head, neck, and trunk; and fractures of upper limbs.

About 866 people a day went to the emergency room with dog bites in 2008, and about 26 people were admitted each day.

Children under 5 and adults 65 and older were most likely to be hospitalized after a bite, and residents of rural areas made four times as many emergency room visits and had three times as many hospital admissions for dog bites than those from nonrural areas, the report said.

Dog bite wounds are difficult to treat and can leave nasty scars. It is important to immediately contact a doctor who can provide the dog bite treatment needed to minimize infection and scarring.

 

The SCAR Project is a series of large-scale portraits of young breast cancer survivors shot by fashion photographer David Jay.

Dedicated to the more than 10,000 women under the age of 40 who will be diagnosed this year alone The SCAR Project is an exercise in awareness, hope, reflection and healing. The mission is three-fold: Raise public consciousness of early-onset breast cancer, raise funds for breast cancer research/outreach programs and help young survivors see their scars, faces, figures and experiences through a new, honest and ultimately empowering lens.

Would you like to get involved?

In a cesarean birth (C-section), the baby is delivered through an incision in the mother’s abdomen and uterus (womb). C-Section births exceed 30% in USA, Brazil, Italy, Mexico, Turkey, Korea, Portugal, Australia, Thailand, and other countries. China is the only country where C-section births exceed 40%. The number of cesarean sections in the U.S. has risen nearly 46% since 1996.

Every C-Section is a major abdominal surgery that leaves a scar. The size of your C-section scar will depend on several factors: the size and position of the baby, whether the C-section was planned or not, etc. Generally, the C-section scar is around 4-6 inches (10-15 cm) long and 1/8 inch (0.3 cm) wide.

Usually the “bikini cut” incision is used but sometimes the “classical” incision will be made vertically from just below the belly button (naval) to just above the pubic bone. To close the wound, some surgeons prefer to use staples whereas others still use suture; there is little statistical evidence to show that one way or another will increase or decrease the size or the appearance of the scar.

Treatment. Initially, the C-section scar will be red, raised and could itch. After the wound is closed you should start using a silicone based product like Strataderm to make the scar softer, flatter and smoother and to relieve itching. The majority of women will develop “mature” C-section scars by the sixth month after delivery. If you have darker skin and/or are prone to keloids you should consult a physician before the C-Section.