In a recent interview with Life & Style, the former star of “The Hills” described a variety of post-surgery scars ranging from a two-inch long blemish under her chin to lumpy legs, uneven breasts and bald spots left from a brow lift.

“People have fewer scars from car accidents than I have on my body,” Montag told the magazine.

All plastic surgery but especially major surgeries like tummy tucks and breast reductions, can involve scarring. Ask your doctor to show you a picture of what the scar looks like beforehand. Another important question is what sort of treatments they offer to minimize scarring, for example silicone gel (e.g. Strataderm), silicone sheeting or laser procedures. It’s not always easy to know in advance whether or not you’re likely to scar. Some people are more prone to scarring than others. People heal differently, and patients with a poor history of wound healing or keloid scars are at high risk of scarring.

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Dog bites can be complicated with deep punctures and some tissue shredding dependent upon the type of dog.

Minor cuts generally only require a thorough cleaning and bandaging of the wound. However, if infection is suspected, it is important to immediately contact a doctor who can provide the dog bite treatment needed. Signs of infection may include redness, swelling, red streaking, and fever. Seeking proper dog bite treatment is crucial to patient recovery.

Other reasons to seek medical care include: a gaping wound, a wound that does not stop bleeding, open wounds on the face. Some dog bite scars are best treated with scar revision, sometimes tissue expansion, and secondary treatments, e.g. silicone gel like Strataderm.

A recent study showed that 1,000 Americans per day are treated in emergency rooms as a result of dog bites. In 2007 there were 33 fatal dog attacks in the USA. Most of the victims who receive medical attention are children, half of whom are bitten in the face.

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Strataderm is a rapidly drying silicone gel for treatment and prevention of scars. It softens and flattens scars, relieves itching and discomfort of scars, and reduces redness and discoloration associated with scars. According to Strataderm web site, a 50g tube of is enough for treatment of a 6×12 cm (2.5×5 inch) widespread scar. It should be ideal for a large burn scar

In a cesarean birth (C-section), the baby is delivered through an incision in the mother’s abdomen and uterus (womb). C-Section births exceed 30% in USA, Brazil, Italy, Mexico, Turkey, Korea, Portugal, Australia, Thailand, and other countries. China is the only country where C-section births exceed 40%. The number of cesarean sections in the U.S. has risen nearly 46% since 1996.

Every C-Section is a major abdominal surgery that leaves a scar. The size of your C-section scar will depend on several factors: the size and position of the baby, whether the C-section was planned or not, etc. Generally, the C-section scar is around 4-6 inches (10-15 cm) long and 1/8 inch (0.3 cm) wide.

Usually the “bikini cut” incision is used but sometimes the “classical” incision will be made vertically from just below the belly button (naval) to just above the pubic bone. To close the wound, some surgeons prefer to use staples whereas others still use suture; there is little statistical evidence to show that one way or another will increase or decrease the size or the appearance of the scar.

Treatment. Initially, the C-section scar will be red, raised and could itch. After the wound is closed you should start using a silicone based product like Strataderm to make the scar softer, flatter and smoother and to relieve itching. The majority of women will develop “mature” C-section scars by the sixth month after delivery. If you have darker skin and/or are prone to keloids you should consult a physician before the C-Section.

Acne is the most common skin disorder, affecting around 15% of the adult population and up to 80% of adolescents. Facial scarring because of acne occurs to some degree in most cases. The majority of acne scars are flat and depressed below the surrounding skin (atrophic), generally small and often round with an indented or inverted centre. To prevent acne scars, do not pop, squeeze, or pick at acne; do not pull scabs of acne; seek treatment early for acne that does not respond to OTC medications.

Types of Acne Scars:

–          red and/or hyperpigmented marks: a post-inflammatory change that usually disappears in 6-12 months

–          acne scars – icepick: depressed scars, deep, narrow and sharp; usually too deep for dermabrasion or laser skin resurfacing

–          acne scars – boxcar: depressed scars, round with sharp edges

–          rolling acne scars: depressed scars, wavy texture in the skin

–          keloids and hypertrophic scars are raised acne scars that may become larger and more noticeable, sometimes painful and itchy.  

Silicone gel like Strataderm is effective for treatment of acne scars and prevention of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Other effective treatments for depressed acne scars include laser skin resurfacing, dermabrasion, scar surgery (punch excision, punch elevation, punch graft, subcutaneous incision), fillers, chemical peel, microdermabrasion and similar procedures that you should discuss with your dermatologist. For raised acne scars, like keloid and hypertrophic scars, your doctor might consider options like intralesional injections, cryotherapy, surgery, laser and light therapy. Your dermatologist will be able to create a treatment plan based on the type of your acne acne scars, results you can expect, and your medical history.

Acne Scars:

Capstone Therapeutics announced that they have met the objectives of their second keloid trial for AZX100.

AZX100 is currently being evaluated for safety and efficacy of medical applications such as the prevention or reduction of hypertrophic and keloid scarring following excision of keloid scars.  Other proven clinical options for prevention of keloid scarring include application of silicone (e.g. Strataderm) after surgical resection which prevented development of hypertrophic scars and keloids in 75-85% of cases.

More information about keloid scarring:

Factors Affecting Abnormal Scarring

How to Avoid Abnormal Scars

With every wound there are certain individual and environmental factors that influence abnormal scarring (e.g. keloid scars or hypertrophic scars) which make the choice of appropriate scar treatment and scar prevention essential.

Age and Hormonal Influence

Although keloid scars and hypertrophic scars can develop at any age, they tend to develop more readily during and after puberty. Menopause tends to prompt the regression of scarring and pregnancy tends to exacerbate it. Scars from thyroid surgery (thyroidectomy scars) can be problematic due to hormonal changes.

Genetic Factors and Previous History

Abnormal scarring is 15 times more likely to occur in darker-skinned individuals. Keloid scar formation occurs in areas of high melanocyte concentration and is rarely found on the eyelids, genitalia, soles and palms. Individuals with ginger hair and freckles are also at an increased risk of keloid scars. People with a previous personal history of keloid scarring are more likely to scar again in an abnormal fashion and those with a family history are also at an increased risk.

Scar location and surgery technique

Scars over or near muscles that are particularly active often spread or become more visible than the scars formed on less active areas. Skin and wound tension during wound repair is also a contributor to increased scarring.

Wound Infection

Wound infection increases the risk of abnormal scarring.

Type of Skin Injury

A variety of different types of skin injuries can lead to the development of keloid and hypertrophic scarring including surgery, burns and inflammatory skin processes such as acne, psoriasis and chicken pox.

Silicone based products, like Strataderm silicone gel, have been recommended by International clinical recommendations on scar management and have become the standard care for plastic surgeons when it comes to scar treatment and prevention of keloid and hypertrophic scars. Silicone is not only considered first line treatment for scars but it is also recommended for use in conjunction with other scar therapy options, such as corticosteroid injections and pressure garments.

Read more about how to avoid abnormal scars.